Triphala and it's Anti-Cancerous Properties


Triphala is an herbal formulation used in the Indian medicinal system of Ayurveda for the treatment of various ailments. It consists of three medicinal plants: Emblica officinalis, Terminalia chebula, and Terminalia belerica. It is used for anemia, jaundice, constipation, asthma, fever, chronic ulcers, inflammation, obesity and to strengthen the immune system against infections such as pneumonia, tuberculosis, and AIDS. Triphala was shown to have beneficial effects in studies done in laboratory and in animals. However human data are lacking.

Purported Uses


To treat Infections

Studies done in mice showed that Triphala can reduce infections. No studies have been done in humans.

To decrease high levels of cholesterol

Triphala was shown to reduce cholesterol levels in rats with high cholesterol. However, this has not been studied in humans.

To strengthen the immune system

Studies in rats have shown that Triphala can improve immune function but human data are lacking.

Research Evidence

Several laboratory studies have shown that Triphala has beneficial effects. However, it has not been studied in humans.

Side Effects

Intestinal gas Stomach upset Diarrhea.

Clinical Summary

Triphala is an herbal formulation that is widely used in Ayurveda for the treatment of various ailments. It consists of equal portions of dried and powdered fruits of three medicinal plants: Emblica officinalis, Terminalia chebula, and Terminalia belerica. It is used for anemia, jaundice, constipation, asthma, fever, chronic ulcers, inflammation, obesity and to promote immunity against infections such as pneumonia, tuberculosis, and AIDS. Triphala has been shown to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, immunomodulatory, chondroprotective, and anticancer properties in vitro. Triphala's effects are due to the polyphenols and flavonoids present in its constituents. It also demonstrated hypolipidemic effects in hypercholesterolemic rats. However, these effects have not been tested in clinical trials. Triphala may cause gastrointestinal side effects.

Purported uses

Anemia Jaundice Constipation Asthma Infections Chronic ulcers Inflammation Obesity Hypercholesterolemia Cancer

Constituents

Amla (Emblica officinalis) Myrobalan (Terminalia chebula) Belleric Myrobalan (Terminalia belerica).

Mechanism of Action

The exact mechanism of action is not known although the polyphenols and flavonoids are thought to be responsible for many of Triphala's effects. Gallic acid, a major polyphenol in Triphala, has antioxidant property. Triphala also increased the reactive oxygen species (ROS) in breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and T-47D), resulting in apoptosis. Terminalia chebula, one of the components of Triphala, was shown to be a potent hyaluronidase and collagenase inhibitor that prevented degradation of cartilage. Triphala also protected mice from radiation-induced mortality. Oral administration of Triphala enhanced the immune functions in rats.